Editorials and letters about forestry in Nova Scotia continued..25Nov2017, forestry elders speak up

In today’s (Nov 25) Chronicle Herald, woodlot owner and operator Tom Miller responds to Stacie Carroll’s COMMENTARY: Education key in understanding lumber industry (Chronicle Herald Nov. 17, 2017). Says Tom:

Every forestry “crisis” that’s happened over my 43 years in this field has resulted in industry suggesting that what was needed is to educate the public in forestry. That this response is once again being put forward either shows how dense the public is or the poor job industry has done in “educating” us.
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Two journeys in Nova Scotia forests

Each generation must make their own journey through a thick terrain.

How ever we get lost along the way, let us rejoice in the healing steps that follow.

I hope we all continue to gather at the edge of the woods where the generations before us and after us re-merge.

– Prologue to Generations Re-Merging by Shalan Joudry

Two recent news stories illustrate these journeys, one about loss, the second about healing.
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Update on the Independent Review of Forest Practices in Nova Scotia names experts

“Bill Lahey, University of King’s College president and leader of Nova Scotia’s Independent Review of Forest Practices, has assembled a team of experts to help review forest harvest practices and the overall role of Crown wood supply throughout Nova Scotia.”

Seven experts are named including two from Maine, three from Ontario one from B.C. and one from Nova Scotia.

“In addition, Prof. Lahey has also asked for advice from the Forest Biodiversity Science Advisory Committee of the Department of Natural Resources.”
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Mining Association of Nova Scotia’s SWAP Initiative – “the threat is real”

wildareaSo says Chris Miller in an op-ed in the Coast today.

…My question is this. Why do we do it? Why do we stick it out here despite the challenges? It’s tough everywhere, but there are certainly more opportunities in places like Toronto, or New York or London.

We all have our own reasons, but I think at least part of the answer lies with Nova Scotia itself. Let’s face it: This is a pretty spectacular part of the planet that we all share. It’s the sort of place that gets into your veins and makes you want to stay, despite the challenges.

…The landscape itself pulls us in and holds us. It infiltrates our lives; our culture; our way of life.

…So, when the Mining Association of Nova Scotia comes along and starts lobbying for access to our protected wilderness areas, we should all be very alarmed.

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New Brunswick co. a leader in new forest assessment technology

Forest metrics for 20 x 20 m cells

This item on a news feed caught my eye: Fredericton’s Leading Edge Geomatics Ready for Takeoff With New Investment (by Cherise Letson in huddle.today, Nov 20, 2017).

…The three men had worked in geomatics in Afghanistan and they knew those skills would be applicable here. They just weren’t sure they could build a viable business…

Ten years later, Leading Edge Geomatics is a New Brunswick company providing aerial survey and geomatics services across North America. Based in Lincoln, Leading Edge has a fleet of four aircraft and seven digital sensors and offers customized solutions to clients across different industries including energy, forestry, and mining…What makes the company stand out from others in the industry, Hogan says, is their specialty in the forestry sector…

On the forestry side, they work with J.D. Irving and other forestry companies in the Maritimes.

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Mining Association of Nova Scotia goes after Kluscap Wilderness Area, sacred to the Mi’kmaq

Is this really 2017? Canada in 2017?

Update Nov 25: Cape Breton First Nations protest mining on Kellys Mountain (CTV News; 3min. video)

Update Nov 21: MANS is on a roll…Mining Association wants access to Pugwash Estuary, Chronicle Herald, Nov 21, 2017 “The Mining Association of Nova Scotia contends the province’s protected spaces plan is harming Cumberland County’s economy.” View *comment by a geologist
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From the Nova Scotia Envioronment/Protected Areas description of the Kluscap Wilderness Area:

Kluscap Wilderness Area
NSE Protected Areas Photo
Click on photo to go to nse/protectedareas>Kluscap Wilderness Area

Kluscap Wilderness Area protects much of the northern part of Kluscap (“Kellys”) Mountain, between St. Anns Bay and Great Bras d’Or. It is a striking landscape, where steep forested slopes rise sharply out of the sea to a narrow plateau of 300 or more metres elevation.

Kluscap Mountain is a sacred Mi’kmaq site. It is said that the great prophet Kluscap (or “Glooscap”) once dwelled in the ocean-side cave near Cape Dauphin, at the northern tip of the wilderness area, and will one day return. The lore and mystery of the cave, known locally as the “Fairy Hole,” coupled with outstanding coastal scenery, attracts visitors who arrive by informal trail or by sea.

MANS (Mining Association of Nova Scotia) does not see it that way, according to a report in the Cape Breton Post (Between a rock and a sacred place on Kellys Mountain, CB Post Nov 19, 2017):

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The Independent Review of Forestry in Nova Scotia Phase 1 underway

The announcement of an Independent Review of Forestry in the Budget address on Apr 27, 2017. The review process got started Aug 30, 2017 with a final report due Feb 28, 2017.

I’m still a little vague on how I was chosen to talk to the Independent Review of Forestry in Nova Scotia in its first phase, but I was invited to do so on Nov 19, 2017 together with Bob Bancroft and Donna Crossland. Bob and Donna are authors of Restoring the Health of Nova Scotia’s Forests that fed into the Natural Resources Strategy 2010 process.

I asked about the context and we were told that in this Phase 1, the Independent Review is simply gathering input on the issues to be discussed further in Phase 2. We were given a list of people appointed as advisors or consultants, but I don’t want to comment (or disclose who the people are) until there is some formal announcement about who is involved.

As we waited for our appointed time at 3 pm on Saturday, six or so reps from Freeman Lumber emerged from the meeting room. About others being asked to talk to the Independent Review in this phase, I don’t know, except that Raymond Plourde/EAC were also to appear or had appeared.

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Fishermen’s Association question “dilution as the solution” for effluent from Pictou pulp mill

What are the most efficient pulp effluent treatment systems now in existence? Surely the best should be the standard for the Pictou mill.

The diffuser would be about here
Click on image to enlarge (from Google Earth)
Fishers are concerned about impacts on lobster, crab, scallop, herring, and mackerel fisheries


UPADE Nov 30, 2017: Westville urges caution to Northern Pulp
in The News Nov. 29, 2017

UPDATE Nov 29, 2017: Fishermen bring concerns to county council about Northern Pulp proposal in The News Nov. 28, 2017

UPDATE Nov 22, 2017: Effluent dump in Northumberland Strait of ‘dire concern,’ says P.E.I. Fisheries minister (The Guardian, Nov 21, 2017)
&
Dirty Dealing: Northern Pulp Mill and the province are set to roll the dice with Boat Harbour’s replacement, but a cleaner alternative exists by Linda Pannozzo in the Halifax Examiner, Nov 22, 2017. Comprehensive. (No longer behind a paywall.)

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Procrastination is a word that might be applied Northern Pulp and the Province’s effort to meet the January 2020 commitment to have a new pulp effluent treatment system in place so that the Boat Harbour pulp mill effluent system can finally be closed.

Remarkably, the Northumberland Fishermen’s Association discovered that while there is plan to place a diffuser system carrying effluent from a new treatment facility about 10 kilometres out in the Northumberland Strait from Pictou, the mill has not even initiated the process for an EA (Environmental Assessment).

View Pulp mill’s wastewater treatment design worries fishermen’s group by Francis Campbell, Chronicle Herald Nov 17, 2017.
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Editorials and letters about forestry in Nova Scotia continued..continued 18Nov2016: Two Perspectives

Did the Forest Funeral confuse the public?

#1 Stacie Carroll, “a silviculturist, small woodlot owner, food forest farmer and the executive director of the Federation of Nova Scotia Woodland Owners” follows V.T. in blasting the Healthy Forest Coalition and the recent Forest Funeral event in particular:

“As I look around at folks who carry paper protest signs on sticks and ask you to bring tissues to an event that celebrates the death of a renewable resource — while eating their cardboard-packaged granola bars, holding their paper coffee cups and carrying a large wooden coffin — I start to wonder where the logic has all gone….By biting the hand that feeds them and by using emotional stimuli, the organizers of these types of protests continue to confuse the public and don’t communicate facts that help Nova Scotians understand forests, forestry and the renewable resource management, which are a major contributor to the financial stability of this province.”

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MANS proposal to swap mines and protected area in Nova Scotia hardly dead in the water

Abandoned mines in Nova Scotia are considered “low hanging fruit” to the mining companies and they want access to them in Protected Areas.

Recent publicity around the Mining Association of Nova Scotia proposal to open up protected lands to mining via a swap proposal led quickly to a “we are not going to do that” response from government.

We might have thought that was the end of it, however, as Raymond Plourde told me, they (MANS] expected that response and that’s why they are pandering to municipalities. He was right.

Warden Vernon Pitts on behalf of the Guysborough Municipal Council writes in the Guysborough Journal today:

The MANS Proposal (A Better Balance – How Can We Protect Jobs and Land?) provides an opportunity to reset our priorities. No one is suggesting that highly sensitive or unique lands be opened up for mineral exploration or development. What is proposed, is that lands of equal or greater value be “swapped” for lands currently protected. This creates a net-gain or win-win situation for everyone.

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