Nova Scotia forests are not the only ones over-harvested, but are likely the most over-harvested in Canada

Four items in Tree Frog Forestry News today (Dec 11th, 2017) illustrate that concerns about over-harvesting of forests are hardly restricted to Nova Scotia.

Section of land just south of New Glascow, Nova Scotia, from map at forests.foundryspatial.com that visualizes forest changes in Canada from 1985 to 2011. I couldn’t find any equivalent to the density of harvests shown above outside of Nova Scotia.
Click on image for larger version.

LETTER: Timber companies have had their day in the sun
From reader Nick Chatten in BC Local News Dec 8, 2017:

Regarding the logging in watersheds, I advise everyone to have a look at the Google maps with the satellite view. Pan around the West Kootenays to areas like Nancy Greene park and you will see a lot of harvest. These guys have had their day in the sun and now they want to tip toe through people’s back yards. When I was in the Selkirk College Forestry program in 1986 we learned of the fall-down effect. Slocan Forest Products (remember them?) learned this effect and now they are a memory. Eventually, the mature timber that can be put through a sawmill diminishes because they are logging so hard.

I have to laugh that the government considers we are logging in a sustainable fashion: utter hogwash! We are harvesting fiber faster than it can grow back. Those trees WAY up the mountain on higher elevations will need 100 years or more to come back…These trees grew on shallow soils in a harsh environment. Sometimes they never come back, just a stunted, planted pine growing where it shouldn’t.

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Scott Leslie’s clear-cut photos of Nova Scotia clearcuts

A picture is [sometimes] worth a thousand words; this is one of those times

Scott Leslie, a renowned Nova Scotia author and nature/wildlife photographer, was the guest speaker at the Thursday Dec 7, 2017 meeting of the Halifax Field Naturalists (HFN) which I attended; his topic: Untamed Atlantic Canada.

Scott’s photographs and reading from his latest book (Untamed Atlantic Canada) held us spellbound.

After the final questions about his presentation he asked if we would be interested in seeing some of his aerial views of clearcuts in Annapolis Co. and Cape Breton. HFN members and generally most of the visitors attending their meetings (which are open to the public) have a keen interest in forests and forestry, so there was little hesitation. We again sat spellbound, this time by some much less comforting pictures than those we had just seen.

Scott gave HFN a selection of the aerial photos to post on their website. The photos “speak volumes” as they say, in this case the volumes of wood that have been scraped wholesale off of our landscapes, leaving wildlife without homes, burning up carbon in the soil and who knows what else – even though the regulations, and in some cases even FSC standards, are being followed.

View Scott Leslie’s clearcut photos

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Northern Pulp open house sessions & apparent behind-the-scenes-tactics apparently not working for them

It seems to come down to no pipe, no plant.

The effluent from the proposed new pulp effluent treatment plant would be released in the Northumberland Strait at approximately location X on the Google map above.
Click on image to enlarge (from Google Earth)

UPDATE Dec 12, 2017: DeMONT: Journalist, miners shabbily treated by big business by John Demont in the Chronicle Herald, Dec 12, 2017.
& in the same issue of the CH, a deAdder Editorial Cartoon; board members hold copies of The Mill, and their PR guy points to a graph of book sales on the smart board… “Here is where we at Northern Pulp tried to quash interest in this book”. (An earlier Bruce Mackinon ed cartoon featured a lobster in pot of pulp effluent.)

UPDATE Dec 11, 2017: Two items in the Chronicle Herald
Sales, interest in The Mill rise after Northern Pulp tries to suppress book Report by Francis Campbell

Northern Pulp: with public money comes accountability Columnist Opinion by Dan Leger

& this one a couple of days ago in The Guardian (PEI): P.E.I. fisherman says meeting increased concerns over effluent dump in Northumberland Strait by Jim Day Dec 8, 2017.
——
Three open houses held earlier this past week (Dec 4,5 & 6) to inform the public and specific stakeholder groups about the proposed new pulp mill effluent treatment seem not to have convinced the people whose livelihoods and homesteads are most directly affected that all is OK.

Nor did some of the Mill’s apparent behind-the-scenes tactics. Extracts from some of the responses in the local press are cited below.

First Nation, fishermen distrust Northern Pulp treatment plan
Francis Campbell in the Chronicle Herald Dec 8, 2017
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Increasing carbon capture & storage should not be complicated for Nova Scotia

A letter in Voice of the People from Helga Guderley reminds us of Nova Scotia’s greatest assets for removing carbon from the atmosphere:

Wood volumes in a piece of SW Nova Scotia (above)
and in a piece of central NS (below)

…the best technology for reducing atmospheric CO2 was invented long ago. Trees, grasses, marine and terrestrial plants sequester atmospheric CO2 very effectively using methods perfected over millions of years. All we need to do to use this wonderfully evolved process is to keep or, even better, increase our forest cover.

Perhaps Nova Scotia could outlaw clearcutting and promote selection harvesting. Perhaps Nova Scotia could integrate carbon sequestration by forests into our cap-and-trade market. Perhaps Bill Lahey’s review of forestry practices could integrate the explicit benefits provided by standing, living trees into the decisions about whether and how trees should be harvested. – Helga Guderley Old-fashioned CO2 removal (CH, Dec 8, 2017)

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Editorials and letters about forestry in Nova Scotia continued..7Dec2017: an appeal for co-existence of forestry, fisheries, agriculture and tourism

The effluent from the proposed new pulp effluent treatment plant would be released in the Northumberland Strait at approximately location X on the Google map above.
Click on image to enlarge (from Google Earth)
Fishers are concerned about impacts on lobster, crab, scallop, herring, and mackerel fisheries.

Like many Nova Scotians, an employee of Northern Pulp Nova Scotia Corporation who felt compelled to write a letter to newspaper about the effluent issue has connections to forestry fishing and farming.

I’ve lived, gone to school, worked and volunteered in Pictou County almost my entire life. I grew up on a dairy farm in Scotsburn, learned about forestry at my father’s side and spent many a day and night on a fishing boat hauling lobster traps, shucking scallops and shaking a herring net, with my stepfather, grandfather and various other family and friends who own fishing gear.

On the mill effluent issue, she comments:
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Halifax trees remember the explosion

I sometimes think there are more big trees per hecare in Halifax than there are in most of rural Nova Scotia. Many are over 100 years old, some well over 200.

So I guess it’s not surprising that some of them, like a few elder citizens, harbour some memories of the Halifax Explosion of Dec 6, 1917. View A century after the Halifax explosion, grim reminders can still be found in trees by Meagan Campbell in Maclean’s Magazine December 5, 2017
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Northern Pulp/Dillon on the road to reassure residents about Nova Scotia Pulp Mill Effluent Treatment Facility, Baxter book session cancelled

The effluent from the proposed new pulp effluent treatment plant would be released in the Northumberland Strait at approximately location X on the Google map above.
Click on image to enlarge (from Google Earth)
Fishers are concerned about impacts on lobster, crab, scallop, herring, and mackerel fisheries.

UPDATE DEC 6, 2017: A CBC story provides more details about cancellation of Baxter book event. “A number of events leading up to the signing, including aggressive conversations directed to store staff, have led us to cancel this event…” spokesperson Kate Gregory said in an email.” View Pressure prompts store to axe event featuring book critical of Northern Pulp By Susan Bradley, CBC News Dec 5, 2017
and
Author upset about cancellation of pulp mill protest book signing
Francis Campbell in Truro Daily News, Dec 5, 2017. “Northern Pulp wants author Joan Baxter and her latest book placed squarely on the Christmas naughty list…”

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“Northern Pulp and Dillon Consulting Limited held an open house at the Pictou County Wellness Centre Monday [Dec 3] outlining future plans for a replacement effluent-treatment facility” according to a report in The News by Sam MacDonald, Dec 4, 2017: Mill outlines proposed effluent treatment.
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Two upcoming presentations related to forests and forestry in Nova Scotia

qweqweqwe

At the Mersey Tobeatic Research Institute, 9 Mount Merritt Road, PO Box 215 Kempt, Queens County, Nova Scotia, Canada

Just received from MTRI:

“Given the news of invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid arriving in southwestern Nova Scotia this past summer, here’s an interesting chance, December 12th at 7pm, to meet one of the American leaders in the field.

This public screening of the short documentary “The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid” is free and will be followed by a question and answer type of discussion period with Mark Whitmore from Cornell University.
Hope to see you there!”.

Click on poster at right for larger version.

Click on image for larger version.

And a reminder (posted earlier under Events)
At Acadia University this evening
A “clear cut” Perspective About “science-based” Forest Management in NS
Donna Crossland to the Nova Scotia Institute of Science
7:30pm at KC Irving Centre Auditorium.
See NSIS announcement

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Business and Public Consultation Meetings scheduled for the Abercrombie, Nova Scotia Pulp Mill Effluent Treatment Facility Replacement EA

With less than a week notice for the public

The diffuser would be about here
Click on image to enlarge (from Google Earth)
Fishers are concerned about impacts on lobster, crab, scallop, herring, and mackerel fisheries

I was forwarded an e-mail (dated Nov 27, 2017, addressed to “Forestry Supplier”) with this information:

Dillon Consulting Limited (Dillon) has been retained by Northern Pulp Nova Scotia (NPNS) to initiate an Environmental Assessment study for the construction of a replacement effluent treatment facility at the Northern Pulp Mill located in Abercrombie, Nova Scotia.

Information on the proposed facility and the Environmental Assessment process can be found on the project website: www.NorthernPulpEffluentTreatmentFacility.ca. We invite you to the first project Open House. It will be a drop-in session format and held at two locations, with the same information presented at each. Local businesses are invited to attend in advance of the public session in order to address questions specific to your interests.

Tuesday December 5, 2017
Glasgow Square
155 Riverside Parkway
New Glasgow
LOCAL BUSINESSES:
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
PUBLIC:
5:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Wednesday December 6, 2017
Abercrombie Fire Hall
2030 Granton Abercrombie Road
Granton
LOCAL BUSINESSES:
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
PUBLIC:
5:00 pm – 7:30 pm

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Red flags and hopes for the Independent Review of Forestry Practices in Nova Scotia

In an op-ed, Government overhaul key to forestry reform (Chronicle Herald, Nov 28, 2017), Dale Smith reviews the lead-up to the Independent Review, its terms of reference and offers a set five recommendations that reflect his experience as a senior bureaucrat in both the NS Dept of Environment and the NS Dept of Natural Resources (he’s now retired).

His perspective that “it is hard not to be skeptical about the recently-announced review”, but “at the same time, it is prudent to avoid rushing to pre-judgment” is shared by many people, myself included, who want the Independent Review to be successful.
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